Posts Tagged: review

Under the Dome (2013 – 2015) – Domefounded

Stephen King strikes again in TV land and so exhales another collective groan. His usual brigade of Yankee stereotypes (local writer, war veteran, religious crackpot, redneck politician, child genius, murderous bully and so on) are residents of yet another Maine

Under the Dome (2013 – 2015) – Domefounded

Stephen King strikes again in TV land and so exhales another collective groan. His usual brigade of Yankee stereotypes (local writer, war veteran, religious crackpot, redneck politician, child genius, murderous bully and so on) are residents of yet another Maine

Smiley Smile (1967) – The Beach Boys

It’s still hard to conceive the dichotomy this record is. Apart from three tracks, Smiley Smile can sound like an artist’s in-joke. For whilst we’re graced briefly with some of their A++ material we’re also hit with a barrage of

Smiley Smile (1967) – The Beach Boys

It’s still hard to conceive the dichotomy this record is. Apart from three tracks, Smiley Smile can sound like an artist’s in-joke. For whilst we’re graced briefly with some of their A++ material we’re also hit with a barrage of

In Search of Mythical Kings: The U.A. Years (1999) – Dory Previn

The title track from critically acclaimed Mythical Kings and Iguanas (1971) and its reprise “Going Home” bookend this album, just as they did the prior; presumably an unimaginative ploy to feign some nostalgia. The material itself is a lot less conventional

In Search of Mythical Kings: The U.A. Years (1999) – Dory Previn

The title track from critically acclaimed Mythical Kings and Iguanas (1971) and its reprise “Going Home” bookend this album, just as they did the prior; presumably an unimaginative ploy to feign some nostalgia. The material itself is a lot less conventional

12 Greatest Hits (1988) – Patsy Cline

Cline’s intense vocal paired with a slick arrangement ensured “Crazy” as the song to tower over all else she recorded, but casual listeners may well revel in the other 1960-1963 material collected here. More instant-familiarity is found in “Walkin’ After

12 Greatest Hits (1988) – Patsy Cline

Cline’s intense vocal paired with a slick arrangement ensured “Crazy” as the song to tower over all else she recorded, but casual listeners may well revel in the other 1960-1963 material collected here. More instant-familiarity is found in “Walkin’ After

XO (1998) – Elliott Smith

Elliott makes it big with his lo-fi feeling-shitty ditty “Miss Misery”, which having been featured in Good Will Hunting (1997) takes him to the Oscars. But where to go from here for a post-grunge boy wonder? Why to a bigger studio

XO (1998) – Elliott Smith

Elliott makes it big with his lo-fi feeling-shitty ditty “Miss Misery”, which having been featured in Good Will Hunting (1997) takes him to the Oscars. But where to go from here for a post-grunge boy wonder? Why to a bigger studio

wishmaster junkieinthe attic
/ Film

Wishmaster (1997): Wishful thinking

“Be careful what you wish for.” Dir. Robert Kurtzman The Genie (djinn, rather) is out the lamp (ruby in this case) and wants three wishes from the bearer so he can call his friends from the other dimension and enslave

wishmaster junkieinthe attic
/ Film

Wishmaster (1997): Wishful thinking

“Be careful what you wish for.” Dir. Robert Kurtzman The Genie (djinn, rather) is out the lamp (ruby in this case) and wants three wishes from the bearer so he can call his friends from the other dimension and enslave

feast poster junkieintheattic
/ Film

Feast (2005): Mayonnaise with that?

“They’re Hungry. You’re Dinner.” Dir. John Gulager Feast begins moderately with textual character introductions on freeze-screens, complete with life-expectancies. This post-modern signifier wants us to believe the film is smart. It’s not. After introduction number-ten, the feeling that a lot

feast poster junkieintheattic
/ Film

Feast (2005): Mayonnaise with that?

“They’re Hungry. You’re Dinner.” Dir. John Gulager Feast begins moderately with textual character introductions on freeze-screens, complete with life-expectancies. This post-modern signifier wants us to believe the film is smart. It’s not. After introduction number-ten, the feeling that a lot